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it was an apt quote. >> host: how many women served in the iraq war? >> guest: over 200,000 served in iraq and afghanistan. >> host: americans? >> guest: yeah. >> host: is that unusual? >> guest: yes. the iraq war in particular set a precedent historically. more women served, were wounded, and killed in the iraq war by around 2005 into the war already than all the wars all poult to the. one in ten troops was a woman. >> host: because of the nature of the war -- >> guest: basically a guerrilla war, there's not any front line. drawing a line in the sand, and the enemy side should meet up and fight. that doesn't happen anymore. battles take place, end roads, hospitals, and even if you drive a truck full of toilet paper you can be attacked. because there's no front line, even if you're combat support or you're an engineer or a cook, you can get drawn into battle, and many, many women also were used as gunners working alongside with the infantry doing the same jobs as the infantry because of the shortage of troops. >> host: women are not supposed to serve in combat, are they? >> guest: right. o
quote. >> how many women served in the iraq war? >> about 200,000 -- over 200,000 served in iraq and afghanistan. >> americans. >> is that unusual? >> yes. the iraq war in particular set a precedent. more women have served and been wounded and killed in the iraq war by about 2005 to get into the war already. all americans for together since world war ii, including afghanistan. so it was a huge, huge difference. one in every 10 troops was women. >> did they serve different capacities in the past quite >> yes, because of the nature of the war, the nature of all boys these days, there isn't any front-line narrow fashion sense, drawing a line in the sand for having an area where the soldiers from the enemy said the meet up in sight. that just doesn't happen anymore. battles take place in roads and hospitals would even if you're driving on the chart with toilet paper, you can be attacked. so because there's no front line, even if you're a combat engineer or a cook, you can get drawn into battle and many, many women also been used working alongside indian country doing exactly the same
it was a very apt. >> host: company women served in the iraq war? >> guest: over 200,000 served in iraq and afghanistan. americans. >> host: is that unusual? >> guest: yes, the iraq war in particular. more women had served in the iraq war by around 2005, two years into the war already, then all the american wars put together, including afghanistan. one in every 10 troops in iraq was a woman. >> host: they serve in different capacities and in the past? >> guest: yes, because it was a guerrilla war, drawing a line in the sand, having an errol where they are our soldiers from enemy side, that is a battle that takes place in roads and hospitals and trucks and toilet paper, it they are used for attacks. it because there is no front line, even if you are an engineer or a cook, many women were being used as gunners and doing the same jobs because of the shortage of troops. >> host: but women are not supposed to serve in combat, right? >> guest: yes, that's right. on the ground, in reality, when you have combat in iraq afghanistan for two years. >> host: was very typical experience for american
revenge in the mountains and deserts of iraq and afghanistan. because a transformative moment for me, was imbedded with the first battalion of the fifth marines, in kuwait in march 2004, and we were making an overland journey of several hundred miles to fallujah, and fallujah was not yet in the news. the battle was still a month away, the first battle of fallujah, and all we did was transport one marine battalion from one place to another. no fighting in between. wasn't particularly dangerous. but the logistics were absolutely immense. gas stations, mountains of water bottles. a tool kit. meals ready to eat. it was just an immense logistical exercise to get men and women and materiale from northern kuwait to fallujah without any fighting, and there you saw how distance mattered. how you just couldn't defeat distance through the latest technology. >> i think it might be interesting for the audience if you'd personalize the story of iraq a little bit, and talk about your own views. this is a place you knew, that you traveled in, in the 1980s and the time of saddam hussein. you were a s
.m. >> brian castner, a bronze star recipient who completed two tours of duty in iraq as a commander of an explosive disposal unit, talks about the impact of the war upon his return. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thanks to everybody for coming. um, this is quite a crowd. we've got standing room only, and that's a wonderful thing. just want to take a second to acknowledge my wife is here, jesse, i dedicated the book to her, and my folks are here, and lots of friendly faces in the audience from various communities in buffalo, so i appreciate that. thank you all for coming. what i'd hoped to do was talk a little bit, first, about the book, then do a reading, a short reading. i, i recorded the audio book. i was lucky enough to do that. so if you really want to hear my voice do the whole thing, you can do that. so i'll do kind of a short section, and then we'll do some question and answer at the end, if that works. where i wanted to start was talking about a trip that i made in may. the first weekend in may every year is the eod memorial down in florida. and eod can,
was a striking scene in the iraq war. i had to find out more about the story and as i interviewed scores of american and iraqi colleagues they came to realize that perhaps his story is critical to understanding america's role of the world stage in the post-bin laden, post arab spring area and maybe even to discover more about what it truly means to be an american. the historical impact of what travis and patrick did as a colleague was rather -- patrick and was a key in the iraq war. infect the war began to turn around in mid-2006, once before the famous surge started happening as patriquin and his military and intelligence colleagues helped iraqis launch something called the awakening which was a sunni tribal revolt against al qaeda. al qaeda of course had never really conquered and held a large piece of territory in the world. there were some exceptions, but what happened in anbar province was al qaeda basically conquered the province and they set up a parallel government, sharia law, courts, a parallel ministry even of government and the rule of this version of radical, radical islam o
in this afghanistan and iraq. the main book i read was hard measures by jose rodriguez. he was, basically, head of the team that put together the interrogation methods after september 11th including waterboarding which has been criticized but which i think was effective and did the job. a very, very well-written book. also the art of intelligence by hank compton. he's with cia, but he was orchestrating, managing, directing the war in afghanistan after 9/11. and, again, a fascinating read. kill or capture by daniel klandman, this follows the obama administration as far as what they're doing in iraq and afghanistan, how their policies are being pursued and shows a side of the president which indicates that his policies are not that different in many cases from president bush's. also peter bergin's book, the hunt for bin laden, which i'm really just starting now. it details the ten-year manhunt for bin laden which, of course, ended very successfully last may when he was killed. and then dr. johnson who's been a witness before on my committee has a book called a battle for the soul of islam which i
i was not on tech and two in iraq, one in pelot and one in kirkuk. came back and move to buffalo in 2007 i thought everything was fine and i got a job and everything was fine for a couple of years until one day when it wasn't find any more. i guess that is what i wrote the book about which was the struggle to figure out what was wrong when i got home and the things i did over there. something was happening to me physically that i didn't understand. i had a physical reaction. i didn't feel worried or stressed and i wasn't having nightmares and i wasn't jumping a car doors and i wasn't doing all the stereotypical things that they tell you is what ptsd is going to look like or any of those coming home issues are going to be like. i had a physical feeling in my chest that i had no name for so i went to the emergency room for a heart attack. and i went back a couple of times. it was never a heart attack and they hooked me up to all the monitors and an ekg and everything else and no, there's nothing physically wrong with you. so then i got referred, i guess the system worked a little b
rapids iowa. "right after 9/11 i haven't been particularly because talking about the iraq war was a substitute for true patriotism speaking out to national security. ". it kept getting worse. the pin he used to like and don't everybody started to like it then he did not like it. he referred to the american replied lapel pin s "that been" listed alto the people what will make the country great and that is a testimony to my patriotism. you heard it right. he called it "that pin" lipo clinton referred to that woman. [laughter] not to fear preparatory. obamacare year-round. he is now wearing it near his heart today every day. the cheesy thing you have to do as president. when he returns to civilian life, hopefully sooner than later. [applause] i suspect he will like to ditch that annoying little 10. he could replace it with united nations flag pins. no bigger than a nickel drives liberals bonkers. here is a guy like me that seems nice i am not foaming at the mouth just my new mail business that i am grateful to live in the united states of america. gratitude of the sacrifices. gra
/11, particularly because as we're talking about the iraq war that became a substitute for i think true patriotism which is speaking out on issues that are of importance to our national security. those are his exact words. yesterday said they. it kept getting worse. the pain he said he didn't like he actually used to like about a foot in america started liking it and so he stopped liking it. in that interview he actually refer to the american flag lapel pin as -- >> i won't wear that pin on my chest instead of going to try to tell the american people what i believe will make this country great. and hopefully that will be a testimony for my patriotism. >> you heard it right. you heard it right. he called it that 10. a little white bill clinton referred to that woman, remember? but not to fear. and not to were the president obama came around. that pain he stopped when because it didn't really show what was in his heart, he is now wearing near his heart today just about every day. it's one of those cheesy things you just have to do as president i guess. when he returns to civilian life, soon i hope r
of iraq. for it was utterly clear the floodgates have been opened so wide that what might be called the politics of the richer america would certainly become american politics. i called it being a critic. all the world is as interested in march of 2010, i wrote about a group of pundits and warrior journalists, eager not to sue u.s. military leave iraq. that appeared on the op-ed page of the "los angeles times" and then began wandering the media world. one of its stops, curiously enough was the military newspaper, stars and stripes. this e-mail respons read your article in stars and stripes. when was the last time you visited iraq? a critique and 15 well-chosen world. his point, i was then a 65-year-old guy who had never been anywhere near iraq and undoubtably never would have. possibly more than once and disagreed with my assessment. this is not to be taken lightly. what, after all, do i know about iraq? only the reporting i've been able to read. the analysis found lots of experts, on the other hand, even from thousands of miles away, i was one of many who could see enough by early
of iraq for us. turns out largely what patriquin wanted it to because he proved to be very effective in fighting al qaeda and try to begin to flip from pro-al qaeda to the coalition side. in my book there are few scenes of patriquin in action. one of them was patriquin first met him. he shows up with a mustache and he speaks arabic slang, iraqi arabic and his first meeting face-to-face at what part of iraq are you from, the north or the south? patriquin as he often did would say something like no i'm from chicago. i am an american and many iraqis were befuddled by that because he thought he might've been an iraqi left as a child and done over and came back with a funny western accident. they met and quickly became very close allies through this struggle. >> you can watch this and other programs on line of booktv.org. >> you dinesh d'sousa presents his thoughts on what a second term for the obama administration would look like. the author contends that the president's policies would greatly reduce america's global force. it's about one hour, 10. [applause] >> thank you. please sit dow
's speak iraq. in the early '80s, the prime minister decided to attack the nuclear reactor in iraq. it wasn't popular here in the u.s., but we did it. and we we were condemned by the u.s., by the state department, we were condemned by the u.n., but years later people exearkted that the -- appreciated that the, grave decision that prime minister begin took in 198 is 1 was for the benefit of the american people. because when you, the american army, invaded iraq, you were able do into the region without taking the risk that iran was nuclear. i'm sure there are some young jewish people in the audience, and for us, i don't mean -- yom kippur is the holiest day of the year. 1973 during the yom kippur, that's something i found out even though i thought i knew everything before i wrote the book, but while doing the research, i learned myself a lot, and i found out that in 1973 when the egyptian and syrian armies caught us by surprise and we were almost in a point that we would have lost the war, and when we lose the war, you know where we can go to, to the sea. it's not that the war that you fight
he was talking about iraq but in fact he meant it and we sometimes, we didn't really listen to bush reducing his statements to the perception we had of him, forgetting that he is representing a system. he is representing an administration. this administration was pushing and is still pushing for many reasons not only political, anything which has to -- today to do with organization in the region and the bloggers who were pushing and spreading around this feeling that something should change in egypt and tunisia and even in syria or in yemen, many of them -- google, freedom house were training people and financing the training of people who are advocating democracy and liberating the country and they were trained by american organizations, european organizations and if we were to study what happened in eastern europe where is the whole process of what is called the european spring, the eastern european spring, you can see that there was behind it a philosophy. no one had heard, enough people have heard about popovich who was getting the sense of of how do we mobilize the people in or
intends the result is getting. of iraq applause] >> good afternoon. welcome to michigan. i don't want to put you on the spot but donate $60 to your $1,000 gift -- [applause] >> if you don't want to take it next time you asked for money at it in. conservatives dig in their own pockets to solve problems. liberals look of the government to take care of them. [applause] >> george is doing okay. i will buy tickets to the film and give them too young people who might not otherwise go. [applause] >> if obama is given a second term what types of changes in his administration or his cabinet, what changes do you see happening that will help achieve his goals? >> obama in his personal appointments has to be a little cautious in the first term. partly because he was a new he needed to figure out how to operate and maneuver so he started with some clinton people and he realized pretty soon that the clinton people were trying to block him. they were trying to block him because they are traditional democrats. if you look in bob woodward's book he talks about the fact that again and again on iraq and
the nuclear reactor in iraq not popular in the u.s. but we did it and we were condemned by the state department and the when years later people appreciated that decision that he took in 1981 was for the benefit of the american people. the american army invades iraq could go win and in 19731 and jewish declared it the holiest day of the year. during the yum! kippur war. i thought i knew everything before the book but i've learned a lot with reset -- research. 1973 with the egyptian and civilian army is caught us by surprise, we almost lost the war. it is not the war the fight yen the it now or afghanistan but it means we are out of the game. we were to the point* first day of the war the state department sent a telegram to the embassy. there was a message from kissinger telling us israelis, wait. hold your horses. do not take action because kissinger will move forward. at that time they egyptian and civilian armies were already on the way to destroy the jewish state. the prime minister at the time was afraid to take a preemptive attack to say i don't know the reaction in washington. n
in the iraq war. >> guest: over 200,000 have served in iraq and afghanistan. >> host: americans. >> guest: yes, americans. >> host: is that unusual? >> guest: ey, the iraq war in particular set a precedent historically, more women served and have been wounded and killed in the iraq war by iran's 2005 into the war already, than all the american wars put together since world war ii, including afghanistan. so, it was a huge difference. one in every ten troops in iraq was a woman. >> host: did they serve in different capacities than hey served in the past? >> guest: yes, bought because of the nature of the war is a guerrilla war, there isn't any front line. having an area where soldiers from the enemy side will meet up and fight. that doesn't happen anymore. battles take place in hospitals, even if you're driving a truck full of toilet paper, you can be attacked. so, because of no frontline, even if you're combat support or an engineer or a cook, you can get drawn into battle, and many, many women also were being used as gunners and working alongside with the infantry, doing exactly the same job a
he was talking about iraq, but, in fact, he meant it. and we sometimes are not -- we didn't really listen to bush reducing his statements to the perception we had of him, forgetting that he's representing a system. he's representing an administration. and this administration was pushing and is still pushing for many reasons, and not only political reasons. anything which has to do today with democratization in the region. and the bloggers, the cyber dissidents who were pushing and spreading around this feeling that something should change in egypt and in tunisia and even in syria or in yemen, many of them, these bloggers, were trained much before, and this was known. google, freedomhouse, other institutes they were training people and financing the training of people who were advocating democracy and liberating the countries. and they were trained by american organizations, european organizations. and if we were to study what happened in eastern europe whereas the whole process of what was called european spring, the eastern european spring, we can see there was behind this a philo
have also used the drones a lot in iraq and afghanistan as part of the larger wars. the u.s. has also used trial and in yemen, somalia. it appears they have used terms in the philippines and in libya as well. now, libya is an interesting case because when there were discussions among the public about the pros and cons of the u.s. intervening in libya, there is one thing that was really left out of the equation and that was whether or not it was a good thing to get involved militarily to overthrow gadhafi. the way in which it was done is to cut congress altogether and the administration's just vacation or not even bringing this up for a discussion in congress is when it's just an air war that we are using drugs and new of u.s. lives are at risk of a congress should have no say and not. so think of the kind of usurpation of power by the executive ranch, taken this away from the legislative ranch and what kind of precedent is set for future people in the white house. we have also been a case of a rat, when the u.s. troops left, left drones behind and put them in the hands not of the mili
them because they are traditional democrats. again and again on iraq and afghanistan. he said we are trying to find a good taliban people. they have yet to service. apparently the obama people are trying to find him. one thing that is opposed by hillary clinton and key people around him, and this is why the whole idea that obama is a big, fat, bungler is not true. obama has actually redefined the citizen's relationship to the government. he has redefined foreign policy or that he has shrunk our footprint in the world. he has achieved more in one term than just about any democrat. from his point of view. he is exceeding spectacularly. >> i've heard christopher hitchens on senator gaetz and several others. i'm curious, are you going to be a support person of god or is there something else [inaudible] >> the question is a little bit about my second career. i am the president of a liberal arts college, it's a christian college. i have 1 foot in two worlds. i write about politics, and i've been there now for 25 years. i'm a secular writer. in the last two years, i have been taking on
. and also because the further you went from iraq are cheaper and cheaper and cheaper. so i was paying $275 a month for a two bedroom house with five acres of land on the edge of twentynine palms, right where the sign said next 100 miles. and that is where this book begins. it begins with a personal crisis and it was no accident that i arrived in this particular landscape. ultimately the desert has been the site of restorative pilgrimage for millennia. and at that particular moment, i don't think i was aware of what i was doing. i didn't say to myself, in big trouble with my life i must go to heal in the desert. but ultimately, that's the space i was venturing. later on i realized that all the symbolism was there to receive me and began the process of healing and getting to know this place, which included almost immediately dealing with the fact that i was arriving on a landscape that had as many problems as mexico city with drugs. i was coming from a place of addiction and all the pain and struggle that goes with that and arriving at a place where math was devotees, meth labs were explodin
with the public good. iraq war, you know, if we don't talk too much about them not fact checking the iraq war and as a result of that. but, you know, speaking the new york times have a mission to provide the public service and for-profit. can you do that? i guess it can be done. i know, i'm going off here on your question. [inaudible] >> what were your trusted news sources for information? >> first thing i did to write this book, i went to the to the peer review literature. and the resource of the peer review literature first is that most people know the peer review process. the peer review process what districts use when you submit research you submit it without your name or institution it goes to a body that fact checks it before it can be published. and once it passes a fact checking and if they really agree in this blind process that you are saying something that is a a contribution and b is not, you know, hogwash then it can be published that's where i started. and there a flaws in every system and there are flaws in the peer review process too. at least it's, you know, substantive in te
. the war in both iraq and afghanistan are very little popular support, yet for a handful of corporations, lockheed martin, northrop grumman and halliburton, they are immensely profitable as the war is for his journey to the concert in tiny segment. as said war is a racket. so we unfortunately have created a world where power has become centralized in the hands of a select group of corporations that are more powerful than the state itself that it is within the american political system and possible to vote against the interest of goldman sachs and unless we support that power, we are doomed because corporations, unfettered federal some coral ridge a great book about this in 1944 called the great transformation turn everything into a commodity and it is a revolutionary force and human beings become commodities, the world becomes a commodity that you exploit until exhaustion or collapse. that is how the environmental crisis is intimately twinned with the economic crisis. and if we don't somehow find a mechanism or a way to break the power of the corporations they can trash or continue to tr
. i think "the new york times" does a good job that have. iraq war, you know, if we don't talk too much about them not fact checking the iraq war and all the people dead as a result of that. but, you know, generally speaking "the new york times" has a mission which is to provide a public service, and they're for profit. can you do that? i guess can t can be done. i know, i went off your question. >> thank you. [inaudible] what were your trusts news sources for information? >> first thing i did to write the book i went in to the preer review literature. the reason i went there first is that most people now the peer review process. s it is a what academics use when you submit research, you submit it without your name our institution it goes to a body that fact checks it before it can get published. once it passes a fact checking and if they really all agree in the blind process, that you are saying something that is a a contribution, and b is not, you know, hogwash. it can get published that's where i started with the peer review process. and there are floss in ever system and there
to anybody i wanted. on the eve of the iraq war, i went to the middle east, had extraordinary experience of sitting with sharon in his residence, and then going to ramallah visiting, and he was hulled up in the bunker, a sort of largely damaged building, high-rise building, six stories high or so, with burned out hulks of cars outside it. we went in, and he help the forth. it was a great experience. i visited latin america. visited with the president of colombia and calderÓn of mexico and chavez, an intense gentleman, who is now ill as you know, but i visited with him under a huge portrait whom he identifies with to a remarkable degree is fair to say. i got to travel with barbara walters to cuba for her second interview with fidel castro, and that was a great experience in part because i really was able to participate in not only seeing the process that a terrific interviewer like barbara goes through in doing an interview, gathers hundreds upon hundreds of questions, widdles them down. we went over questions the entire time so she thought about which to ask, whatnot to ask, what to com
iraq but he meant it and we didn't really listen to. reducing his statements or the perception we have of him, for getting he is representing a system. he is representing an administration. this administration pushing for many reasons and not only political reasons anything which has to do today with the democratization in the region. the bloggers and cyberdissidents who were pushing and spreading around of feeling that something should change in egypt and tunisia and even syria or yemen many of these blockers -- this was known. google, freedom house, they were training people and financing the training of people who were advocating democracy and liberating the countries and they were trained by american organizations and european organizations and if we study what happened in eastern europe with the whole process of the european spring, eastern european spring because behind it was a philosophy no one had heard and not enough people heard about sasha pop povich who was getting a sense of how we mobilize the people in order to push for a massive demonstrations in the country. the fact
in iraq. he is coming up in just a minute to do a callin with us so you'll have a chance to speak with him in a minute. the national book festival is sponsored by the library of congress, and the library of congress has an exhibit at the actual physical library, and a booth down here at the book festival, called "books that shaped america." our book tv colleague was talking with people who are walking through the exhibit and people attending the book festival this year, about what books they thought shaped america. this is taped earlier today. >> we're here on the national mall in washington, dc. tell me you name and what you too for the library of congress. >> i'm tracy north, reference librarian in the hispanic division. >> how did you come up with the list of books that shaped america. >> the list was put together by a committee of representatives from all different offices and units of the library. it was not meant to be a comprehensive list. just a list to get people started talking about the topic. >> when the kind of criteria did you use? >> no specific criteria i know of. it was ju
on terror was being conducted. she did not like the way that the war in iraq was being conducted. above all, she was alienated by something that doesn't get talked about a lot now, but i think will loom large in the histories of our country. not just the supreme court. that is the terry scheiber case. the terry schiavo case had a very big impact. the idea of medical decision-making for a critical ill person was not just an abstraction for justice o'connor. in fact, in 2005, she left the court to take care of her husband. she was replaced, ultimately, by samuel alito. the court now reflects the modern republican party. it is worth pausing to think about the last three justices left the supreme court. sandra day o'connor, david tudor, and john paul stevens. three more different human beings you'll never meet. sandra day o'connor, this tall, charismatic, outgoing, politician from arizona. david souter, the shy, introverted. and john paul stevens. what are they all have in common? they're all moderate republicans who left the court deeply and totally alienated from the modern republican party.
him off to iraq, and he is unavailable for comment or to answer any questions by investigators. not to mention president obama's senior adviser for latin america was also getting briefed on program. and so why does this matter to you? why does this matter to young people, why is this a topic you should be interested in? fast and furious is, like i said, a huge scandal. it's a scandal with many scandals in a scandal. whether it's the justice department turning law-abiding gun dealers into criminals to push their own anti-second amendment political agenda, the documentation backs that up, the internal e-mails back that up, whether it's the attorney general changing his story under oath and not being held accountable for this, whether it's the whistleblowers who, like i keep saying, were the only ones who were actually being factual, having their careers destroyed. just today, actually, and this week the new atf director, you know, issued a somewhat minor threat trying to be under the radar, and i don't think he really understands how youtube works because he recorded it and put i
after 9/11 because we're talking about the iraq war that became a substitute for i think true patriotism which is speaking out on issues that are important to the national security. he said that. it kept getting worse. the pin he said he didn't like, he actually used to like until everyone in america started liking. pee stopped liking it. in that interview, he actually refer to the american flag lapel pin as that pin. >> i won't wear that pin on my chest instead i'm going to try to tell the american people what i believe will make the country great and hopefully that will be a testimony to my patism. >> you heard it right. you heard it right. he called "that pin." a little bit like bill clinton referred to "that woman." remember? [applause] but not to fear, not to worry, president obama came around. that pin he stopped wearing because it didn't really show what was in his heart he is now wearing near his heart today just about every day. it's one of the chose cheesy things you have to do as president, i guess. when he returns to civilian life, sooner, i hope rather than later -- [applaus
carrier. even she the enterprises badly damaged. you can say this is iraq w-whiskey and one part of policy. but that is his style and in fact at a time when you can say japanese have generally held the initiative and for the most part material superiority, think you can make the case that a theater was given to the kind of literacy needed to to turn the tide to launch the stroke and change the doctor review well. halsey was that kind of man. he immediately visited guadalcanal, st. thomas jenifer vandergrift and said what you? i think the fact that he was in the physical presence asked him that question was the most important demonstration he could've made to his two demurring position. and so companies that i nietzsche to give me everything you've got. he looked to many ion that you've got it. little bit insight of what leadership really barrister. you have the trust between commanders. you have a felt obligation that affects the decisions commanders may be a policy from that point forward never stated to send carriers force the south and he committed himself to a very regular and progress
peninsula. there was a mole high up. i don't know it was an iraq, but one we hit, and bragging that we did that, we had to extra kate the agent before he was found, which we did, but the british were not happy. long and short of it is that they fear, i think, and, you know, it's also famous that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and president obama don't plan joint vacations in the foreseeable future, and so i think they are looking at pre november 6 because after if obama wins, he's unbound. he doesn't have to worry about re-election, and i think frankly, that's the real line that's most likely to be one the israelis are looking at. if they knew romney wins and confident they could wait until 2013, they'd rather do that because the u.s. would probably join in. that's a chance i don't think they feel they can necessarily take so they will take a fresh look, i think, in early object. plans are in place, and they have a higher opinion of their chances of success than the obama administration has or other quarters. >> i'm skip, one of the board members here at discovery institute, and i'm eng
to be difficult to find the money with whars coming. the wars we fought in the last decade in afghanistan and iraq, they were expensive, controversial, probably always be controversial, but we ought to recognize as well that the biggest obligations we have, the greatest pressure on taxpayers and on our fiscal policy comes not from those wars or policies people disagree about, but the policies we all believe in, programs everybody wants, namely social security and especially medicare, and unless and until we find ways to reform those programs to make them more affordable, we're going to continue to have trouble, both abroad and at home. >> host: and the last call for our two guests comes from bill in california. first of all, bill, where in california are you, and then go ahead and ask your question. >> caller: marina del ray. >> host: thank you. >> caller: okay. i never hear discussed what, to me, is clearly and obviously the real problem in the country. i like to paraphrase james' old saying in the election of 1992, it's the economy, stupid. it's the culture stupid. the culture of america is chan
of the army. the army cannot feed itself anymore, which is kind of ridiculous. look at other scandals in iraq can you see these across the board. national security badges is what i did and at some point it struck me as overwhelming that these things were not working as the vonage had claimed they would work. and there are some things that not only because of cost effect of mass i don't want some contract to looking at sensitive surveillance intelligence. i don't want some contractor choosing who is going to get hit by a drone. >> hi, i am a holocaust survivor and a civil rights veteran. and what i see happening in this country as they move towards fascism, which very much resembles that of our germany, which silenced pretty much the labor movement, which restrict to voter participation in the media as well. we no longer have the media that takes on the lives that are being spread and that we are being fed on a daily basis. there are very few outlets we can actually read or hear the truth of what is happening in our government. and my fear is that we are going down a really steep and quick asc
zacks.com. >> he was in opel. cars that everyone in iraq tries to no one in america knows about. but again, the suspicion was raised whenkn i realized the bak of the car was a little lower to the ground in the front. lower and given the rules of engagement come you cant justthr shoot someone ulbecause they lok suspicious.use they well, sir, scott, why why did you shoot him? well, i got scared. you got scared? so you killed a man? well, yeah, sir. like, i have a gun. like, you can't do that. and given the rules of engagement, you can't just shoot someone unless you know they have the weapon, you know they're aiming, or you know that they've been -- they've killed someone or they're in, i should say, they're in the action. so given the rules of engagement, i couldn't just shoot someone that looked suspicious. so i knew the best thing to do was to yell at him to get out of his car. so as i did, i was looking over my left shoulder kind of facing him. i was in the lead stryker vehicle, had metal basically up to my neck, i was inside the stryker standing up. i still had my m-4, my oak
to george w. bush and iraq. one of the signers of this book is abraham lincoln and the civil war. the thing about lincoln is the experience of america during those years in the demand you almost might think is there anything further to be said about abraham lincoln? thoreau essays, both a cause of the lessons we can take away from it, his life experience and presidency and also because amazingly enough, new sources still turn up from time to time coming from a place like this if your president usually helps because sun has been a story in here trying to give the reader a sense of what the experience was that in this case abraham lincoln and the civil war. because you come here to the house where he spent so much time is president of the you can go into the room where he woke up in the morning, look outside. you can hear a lot of this sounds that are similar to what he would've heard at the time. >> this is my favorite room in the house, which is the library. for a couple reasons. one is to get the sense perhaps of what the atmosphere in this room was like when lincoln was living here and pr
james madison and were taking 12, to george w. bush and iraq. one of the centers of this book is abraham lincoln in the civil war. and the thing about lincoln is that the experience of america during those years, you almost might think is there anything further to be said about abraham lincoln. there always is, both because of the lessons we can take away from his life experience and his presidency, and also because i'm basically enough new sources still turn up from time to time. coming to a place like this that you're writing about a president it you shall helpful because i was a historian trying to repeat, or give the reader a sense of what the president experience was. in this case, abraham lincoln in the civil war. and because you've come here to this house where he spent so much time while he was president, you could go into the room where he woke up in the morning. you can see the sights he saw while looking outside. you can hear a lot of the sounds that are very similar to what he would've heard at the time. this is my favorite room in in e house, which is the library. for a coup
the second iraq war, what could it find all the wmd we were looking for. we had to have defectors help us. these things are hard to do. the end of the second iraqi freedom we found 12 of jet planes buried in the sand. you very cruise missiles all mile down. so we don't have any ability to find stuff. it is a breakout we don't have a substitute for nuclear weapons, and nuclear weapons were one of the things that have deterred a major full scale war, though you had major regional conflicts like the non-parsable in the middle east. we don't have a substitute. some of the prominent former secretaries of state are pushing the idea of nuclear zero, make it quite clear that they're looking for any future and a lot of things have to be in place before we do this. but it's possible that popular opinion could as it has happened from time to time stampede governments to do things they are not ready to do. for example, one time it was for the better, and that was to end atmospheric testing and it was popular outrage over some of the early tests and their aftereffects. and the worry about them, that l
toward veterans from iraq or croin afghanistan?he >> the crossing of the0 dav atlantic ocean takes 20 days80 or it could be 80 days with icebergs or storms.john john adams traveled by seavery and of boat was struck by lightning. te all the passengers had to ship take turns until they got to he. land to pump. t it is hard to get around the united states. new yorplk city, albany new york if you took a horrors it would take three days. if you took a boat it would take three days.m owh, f been to now on a train it ises a few hours.
find after the gulf war and before the second iraq war, we couldn't even find all the wmds were looking for. we had to have defectors help us. these things are hard to do. the end of the second iraqi freedom we found 12 of jet planes buried in the sand. if you could very cruise missiles i mile down. so we don't have any ability to find stuff. it is a breakout we don't have a substitute for nuclear weapons, and nuclear weapons were one of the things that have deterred a major full scale war, though you have had major regional conflicts like vietnam and several in the middle east. we don't have a substitute. some of the prominent former secretaries of state are pushing the idea of nuclear zero, make it quite clear that they're looking far into the future and a lot of things have to be in place before we do this. but it's possible that popular opinion could as it has happened from time to time stampede governments to do things they are not ready to do. for example, one time it was for the better, that was to end atmospheric testing and it was popular outrage over some of the early tests an
with rights of difficulties posed by their respective constitutions in such countries as egypt, lebanon, iraq, afghanistan or turkey. only when he turns to his own country does his acuity disappear in favor of general denunciations of our political system as if our political system has nothing to do with the constitution that gave it life and preserves its fundamental forms. he concludes with acknowledgements. after mentioning many people, some of them in this room who directly contribute to the ideas and writing of a book i mention my three grandchildren. rebecca and 1-year-old sarah. none made a direct contribution to the book but all deserve recognition as a splendid people. moreover they are truly the source of my passion concerning what i call in the title the crisis of governance in contemporary america and the role played if only marginally by the 51 constitutions within the united states in making it more difficult to resolve the problems that will dominate their futures. they deserve better. all of our families and strangers with whom we are connected as fellow citizens and happens i
spend in the place called iraq and office right, we could take this money and rebuild this place called america. you know it and i know it too. [applause] >> all right i'm going to throw out one more question. we're going open it up to questions from the audience. we love to hear you speak, sister. no apologies. when we think about the next three years, i'll start with you professor west. the next three years in respective of who gets elected president, we're facing all these challenges but we're facing these historical milestones inspect 2013 tees 50th anniversary of bathrooming ham, alabama the march on speech by dr. king. assassination of med gar veafs. it is a radical speech king is talking about reparation. we have to struggle and go to jail together to get that belostled community multiracial democracy. in 2014 it's going to be the 50th anniversary of the civil rights act and mississippi freedom summer. the summer project where the three civil righters were kill assassinated that year. it's the 50th of atlanta city and fannie lou and mississippi democratic party. it's the 50th of
looking for. we had to have help. these things are hard to do. the end of the second iraq i can freedom we found 12 jet planes buried in the sand. .. for example that was to end -- and it was popular outrage over some of the early testing or after effects, and the worry about them that led to the testing. on the other hand, the europeand to support the so-called neutron weapon, neutron bomb to stop russian tanks and hellman schmidt had state his administration on it and carter reversed it under pressure. there was a proper and that campaign marred -- mounted against it. nuclear zero does have a -- but the risks of prematurely going to zero and finding yourself with the worst countries in the world producing formerly hidden weapons is the problem of the clandestine casualty as recalled by the great strategist herman cahn is something we had better keep in mind and until we have a solution to that problem, rushing towards nuclear zero could prove to be catastrophic. and i will close with this. two things. one on the downside and then one on the upside. the downside is that their piece to be
those which have been most markedly during the period i was very close to him. iraq was the most illiterate person i ever met in terms of constructing his own identity and his achievements -- his achievement was an achievement of identity in the modern world. first the shift from not international to american, then not white, but black. >> host: mauch mood was a group of pakistani friends that barack had been started in occidental and going to new york. he made friends with several pakistanis who came to occidental and and a shared to an internationalist perspective, which he had lived in indonesia and his mother was buried and he was neither black nor white. he was searching for himself and he was comfortable with these guys. so when he got to new york, some of his pakistani friends had moved they are and their friends were there. he was at columbia law school. and it's true. i mean, obama moved to new york to be closer to harlem and to find his blackness, but it did happen today. president obama but i interview to the oval office he made no lasting effort during his four years
the huddled masses, she welcomed gamblers iraq to sidle up to the all you can eat $3.99 buffet. a replica, lady luck. in other words, and we've got three billion of these? a small, discolored rectangle that mars her crown's most prominent spike. it was the telltale giveway. someone somewhere had said, yeah, that seems about right. it must be her, and if it's not, i doubt anyone will notice. the united states postal service released an official statement but not of apology, of adoration. quote: we still love the stamp design and would have selected the photograph anyway. [laughter] they admitted no defeat, made no excuses, announced no recall. they also, it must be said, made me proud to be an american where at least i know i'm free to pretend i totally meant to do that. [laughter] even when i totally screwed up. after all, what was the postal service to do? should it deny it made a mistake? as, yes, original author james madison might have wished in that summer of 1787, and as perhaps antonin scalia would probably still, perhaps, advise today. should it recall the stamp and continue livin
egypt, lebanon, iraq, afghanistan or tour keep. it is only when he turns to the own country that his acuity seems to disappear in favor of general initiation of the political system as if our political system has nothing to do with the constitution that gave it life and preserved the fundamental force. framed concludes was acknowledges. after mentioning many people, some of them in the room, who directly contributed to the ideas and writing of the bock we mention my three grandchild, rebecca, eel will, and the now 1-year-old sara. none made a direct contribution to the book but all, quote, deserve recognition however as splendid people. more over, they are truly the source of my passion concerning what i call in the title th crisis of governments and contemporary america and the role played if only margely by the 51 constitutions in the united states in making it more difficult to resolve the problems that will dominate the futures. they deserve better, unquote. all of our families wees the strangers with whom we are connected as well as citizen and inhabits of the united states not
, withdrawing from iraq, running away from afghanistan on a date certain withdraw time lime that's encouraging the taliban. i didn't talk much about foreign affairs and threatening the benefit packages which is why the veterans signed up for and deserve it. i think they'll vote against him. finally, the jewish vote, i trust medved, trust them both, and they told me in the entire adult life they never saw the jewish-american vote so leans towards voting for republican in such strong numbers. there's one word "israel" written all over it. president obama is hose still to israel. left benjamin netanyahu in the basement, say call me if something changes, did not treat him like the best ally in the middle east and probably in the world and a democratic country at that with elected leaders in the tradition is strong and ought to be supported. mitt romney is a friend of israel, and that matters to any friend of israel, jewish or not jewish in the united states. >> thank you. >> there's agreement in the room that we need to reform large entitlement programs as you mentioned, but i think there's agreem
with the war in iraq. so in short what i can just say was that yes, but the gulf of tonkin documents reveal that, they were doctored. >> with the benefit of hindsight and research, were there any policies or strategies that the united states could've adopted at the time to change the outcome, to achieve our political objectives? >> there are two types of the stories. there are the historians who love to play with counterfactual is an do that what if, and there are those who don't like it. i'm on the side -- but it's a good question. and i would say no. even though i say that in certain ways the unsung heroes of my book are basically ho chi minh and giap. they were the moderates in the war. and it would be incredible just to think about how different that war would've been had actually been in fall. i think would been far less bloody for the vietnamese communists. but there was no way that we could unseat him. so even though one of the things that his detractors kept pointing to with the damage that an american bombing was doing to socialism development in north vietnam, had we been more sup
high school seniors today or veterans from iraq and afghanistan. >> guest: well, sure. it's harder to get around the world. and a crossing of the atlantic ocean takes 20 davis -- days if you're lucky. it can take 80 days of you fall in iceberg and storms. john adams crosses the atlantic and the ship is struck by lightning and everybody has to pump until they make landful. the passengers have to take turns because the ship is filling with heart. so it is hard, it is hard to get around. it's hard to get around the united states. to go from new york city to albany, new york, if you took a hours, that would take you three
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